What is Qi Gong?

 
 
 
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What is Chi Kung?

The chi kung (气功 in Chinese, pinyin Qigong) refers to a variety of techniques usually associated with traditional Chinese medicine, which includes mind, breathing and exercise. The chi kung practice, is done usually with objectives aimed at maintaining health, but also in some cases, especially in China, are prescribed for specific therapeutic purposes. According to Buddhist and Taoist traditions, is largely used as a method to attain enlightenment or Buddhahood.

The Chinese character chi means 'air' (fluid encourages breathing) and has a similar meaning to the ancient Greek pneuma or prana of the Hindus; kung means 'work' or 'technical'. The chi kung can therefore be translated as "breath work" or the art to make the breath circulate, in the most suitable way for the purpose for which it is practiced.

There are many different systems of chi kung. The Chi Kung can be practiced with the body still or moving and involve preset patterns or not (chi kung spontaneous). Various forms of traditional qigong in China are related to health, the spiritual currents of China (Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism) and martial arts.

The chi kung practiced for hygienic therapeutic purposes is based on the principles of traditional Chinese medicine. The chi kung practiced for spiritual purposes is related to the principles of alchemy and varies depending on the current and spiritual specific. Many styles of chi kung related to Chinese martial arts are linked to places or spiritual currents such as Shaolin or Wu Dang.

In every practice Chi Kung is important to be well rooted. Being rooted means being balanced and in firm contact with the ground. Requires contact, center and balance. To ground the body should imitate trees taking root and invisible under foot. The root should be as wide as deep. The 意 Yi (intention) must grow first, because Yi leads the Chi. The Yi should be able to direct the Chi to toe and communicate with earth. Only if the Yi can communicate with the ground, you can grow the Chi beneath your feet and get into it to create the root.

The bubbly well cavity (Yongquan) is the door that allows Chi communicate with earth. Having developed the root, you must learn to keep the concentration. A stable concentration makes Chi to develop equal and uniform. Develop root refers not only to the body but also to the position or movement. The root of any shape or movement, is in its purpose or principle.

The three regulations (San Tiao) 三 调

1. Regular Body (Tiao Shen) 调 身

When the shape (body posture) is not correct, 气 Qi (energy) is not constant. (When) the Chi is not constant, the Yi (mind) has no peace. (When) the Yi has no peace, then the Chi suffers a disorder.

Learning proper relaxation is a prerequisite to acquiring a good practice. Only when you are relaxed will be open all channels of Chi.

Stages of relaxation:

1. Relaxing the mind
2. Relax the breathing
3. Relax the body

The Root (Gen) 根

In every practice Chi Kung is important to be well rooted. Being grounded means being balanced and in firm contact with the ground. Requires root contact, center and balance. To ground the body should imitate trees take root and invisible under foot. The root should be as wide as deep. The 意 Yi (intention) must grow first, because Yi is the leader in Chi. The Yi should be able to direct the Chi to toe and communicate with earth. Only if the Yi can communicate with the ground, you can grow the Chi beneath your feet and get into it to create the root.
The bubbly well cavity (Yongquan) is the door that allows Chi communicate with earth. Having developed the root, you must learn to keep the concentration. A stable concentration makest Chi develop similar and uniform. Develop root refers not only to the body but also to the position or movement. The root of any shape or movement is in its purpose or principle.

2. Regular Breathing (Tiao Xi) 调 息

Regular breathing means regulating the breathing action until it is relaxed, steady and calm. There are eight keywords in breathing that everything Qigong practitioner must consider during their practice:

1. Quiet (Jing)

2. Soft (Xi)

3. Deep (Shen)

4. Long (Chang)

5. Continuous (You)

6. Uniform (Yun)

7. Slow (Huan)

8. Delicate (Mian)

3. Regular Mind / Heart (emotional) (Xin Tiao) 调 心

Calming the mind is one of the main challenges for the practitioner of Chi Kung.

Confucius said, "First you must be quiet, then your mind will be serene. Once your mind is quiet, be at peace. Only when you are alone, you will be able to think and ultimately progress."